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3 Simple Ways to Optimize Your Bandwidth Management in Video Surveillance

Although an organization’s IT infrastructure is typically built to handle large amounts of data, many operators are not fully leveraging the functionalities of their investments to optimize bandwidth capacity. Multicasting, multistreaming and video compression are three innovative methods that users can use to optimize bandwidth management in video surveillance applications.




When it comes to IP video surveillance, it is important to efficiently manage the way video streams are transmitted over the network in order not to overload the available bandwidth. Even though IT infrastructures are built to handle any kind of data, the applications generating traffic over the IP network need to be conducive with the efficient utilization of the network resources in place. To this end, different functionalities and mechanisms are offered by IP video surveillance solution providers to allow optimization of bandwidth and network resources such as:

  • Multicasting
  • Multistreaming
  • Video compression

Even though the capacity and speed of the network are constantly increasing and its associated costs are declining, this is still not a good reason for users to ignore the additional investments and efforts needed to optimize bandwidth management. The amount of data travelling on the network is also still on the rise and therefore, investments in bandwidth optimization are ones that can contribute to a reduction in total cost of ownership, specifically in respect to efficiency gains and maximized resources.

For example, in video surveillance, more and more end-users are requesting cameras with higher picture quality and resolution, often opting for high-definition and megapixel cameras. These types of cameras require much more bandwidth than standard definition cameras. Also, more and more people inside as well as outside an organization’s walls are requesting access to video streams over the network. In the case where a large number of users are simultaneously trying to access a specific video stream, efficient use of network resources can be crucial in avoiding overloaded capacity and entire network crashes.

It is equally important to realize that optimizing the bandwidth on the network does not necessarily go hand in hand with large capital investments, but is more a matter of putting the right solutions in place and leveraging the unique and powerful capabilities of these solutions. There are simple ways to optimize bandwidth management in IP video surveillance and three existing and proven methods will be discussed below.

Uncovering Common Methods of Video Stream Transmission

There are essentially three ways of transmitting video streams over the network from the source to the destination: broadcast, unicast and multicast.

Broadcast

Broadcast is defined as a one-to-all communication between the source and the destinations. In IP video surveillance, the source refers usually to the IP camera and the destination refers to the monitoring station or the recording server. In this case, broadcasting would mean that the IP camera would send the video stream to all monitoring stations and recording servers, but also to any IP devices on the network, even though only a few specific destination sources had actually requested the stream. Typically, this method of transmission is not commonly used in IP video surveillance applications, but can be seen more often in the TV broadcasting industry where TV signals are switched at the destination level.

Unicast

Unicast is defined as a one-to-one communication between the source and the destination. Unicast transmissions are usually done in TCP or UDP and require a direct connection between the source and the destination. In this scenario, the IP camera (source) needs to have the capabilities to accept many concurrent connections when many destinations want to view or record that same video at the same time.

In terms of video streaming in unicast transmission, the IP camera will stream as many copies of the video feed requested by the destinations. In figure 1 below, three copies of the same video stream are sent over the network; one copy for each of the three destinations requesting the stream. If each video stream is 4 Mbps, this transmission will produce 12 Mbps (3x4Mbps) of data on multiple network segments.

As a result, many destinations connected in unicast to a video source can result in high network traffic. In other words, if we imagine a large system with 200 destinations requesting the same video stream, we would end up having 800 Mbps (200x4Mbps) of data travelling over the network, which is realistically unmanageable. Although this method of transmission is widely used over the Internet where most routers are not multicast-enabled, within a corporate LAN, unicast transmission is not necessarily the best practice as it can quickly increase the bandwidth needed for viewing and recording camera streams.

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Article Topics
Video Surveillance · Features · Genetec · IP Video · Video Surveillance · All Topics
Features, Genetec, IP Video, Video Surveillance




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