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Michigan’s Licensing Standards Fall With Approval of New Law

Despite a spirited lobbying effort by the Burglar and Fire Alarm Association of Michigan (BFAAM) and others, the state’s licensing standards have been upended following the signing into law of two bills that created the Security Alarm Systems Act.



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Despite a spirited lobbying effort by the Burglar and Fire Alarm Association of Michigan (BFAAM) and others, the state’s licensing standards have been upended following the signing into law of two bills that created the Security Alarm Systems Act. 

As I reported in the December issue, Michigan Senate Bill 1291 and SB 1292 had been vehemently opposed by security industry stakeholders, who argued the legislation would remove consumer protection aspects of an existing statute that regulated the electronic security industry and protected consumers from criminal activity within it. 

Joining in opposition to the legislation, which was heavily supported by AT&T, was the Electronic Security Association (ESA), law enforcement and Michigan’s Department of Licensing and Regulation. Petitioning state lawmakers ended when the two bills were signed into law Jan. 2. However, state licensing battles are gearing up to be waged elsewhere across the nation where AT&T and other telecoms are spearheading similar lobbying efforts. In a nutshell, AT&T desires to establish a separate set of licensing requirements for installing IP-enabled security systems. 

“Many safeguards were lost when these bills were signed into law, including effective and comprehensive criminal background checks, competency and qualification requirements, and provisions regarding uniform requirements, company name restrictions and advertising criteria,” John Chwat, ESA’s director of government relations, told me this week. 

Chwat explained while this is not a comprehensive list of revisions to Michigan’s previous law, it does give a brief overview of the areas the new legislation will influence. “We believe that all states should be aware that AT&T intends to move into other states and to be on alert for this new legislation. ESA will continue to work with members and chapters to monitor the progression of this legislation in other states.”

Rodney Bosch | Managing Editor


Article Topics
Blogs · AT&T · BFAAM · Burglar and Fire Alarm Association of Michigan · Electronic Security Association · ESA · John Chwat · All Topics

About the Author
Rodney Bosch
Although Bosch’s name is quite familiar to those in the security industry, his previous experience has been in daily newspaper journalism. Prior to joining SECURITY SALES & INTEGRATION in 2006, he spent 15 years with the Los Angeles Times, where he performed a wide assortment of editorial responsibilities, including feature and metro department assignments as well as content producing for latimes.com. Bosch is a graduate of California State University, Fresno with a degree in Mass Communication & Journalism. In 2007, he successfully completed the National Burglar and Fire Alarm Association’s National Training School coursework to become a Certified Level I Alarm Technician.
Contact Rodney Bosch: rbosch@ehpub.com
View More by Rodney Bosch
AT&T, BFAAM, Burglar and Fire Alarm Association of Michigan, Electronic Security Association, ESA, John Chwat, Licensing Standards


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