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Growing Security Threats, Concerns Have Security Pros Expecting Opportunities for Growth in 2016

SSI interviewed 20 leading members of the industry to offer their projections for the new year across six categories.

There is much reason for business optimism heading into 2016. Most analysts expect the U.S. economy to sustain its recessional recovery and key indicators like job creation, lower unemployment and increased construction of new homes and sales of existing are all conspiring to sweeten C-suite outlooks. For security, an industry that typically outperforms the overall marketplace, this is a particularly positive predicament.

“It should be a dynamic year for all parties in the expanding security industry, with a great deal of exciting technological advancement and convergence,” says Jorge Hevia, senior vice president, sales and marketing, for NAPCO Security Technologies. “The opportunity for growth is certain, as security in today’s world has taken on increasing importance. It has had a light shone on it in the media, and has become an increasingly valuable offering since the safety and peace of mind it ultimately provides is among the most highly prized of benefits.”

The majority of industry professionals share the enthusiasm expressed by Hevia, who is among the more than 20 leading dealers, integrators, manufacturers and consultants – many of them among electronic security’s most renowned figures – SSI interviewed for its annual Industry Forecast. Of course, it’s not all a walk in the park; you still have to earn it.

Broken out into six areas of concentration (Technology; Markets; Business & Operations; Security Industry; Regulations & Compliance; and Pressing Challenges), the experts dig into most every conceivable niche, nook and cranny to help company owners and managers be as prepared as possible to succeed during the next 12 months – and beyond.

2016: SECURITY TECHNOLOGY

Ian Johnston, CTO, Digital Watchdog: Security technology is a huge win for the consumer. Surveillance continues to get cheaper and cheaper, and better and better for “entry-level” products. It is easier than ever to make a “good” IP camera. The giants are offering a commodity solution for pennies on the dollar. The commoditization and price slash of IP solutions has been far more drastic and aggressive than analog technologies over their histories.

The crossover from the consumer electronics world will continue to grow, and new exciting solutions will make their way into an otherwise sleepy, stagnant security industry. Access control will start to be eaten alive by the “Ring” solutions of the world, and the only respite for the giants will be fire and the collateral domains they can control from there. Silicon Valley will slowly take over more territory as they eat their way into the infrastructure.

RELATED: What Type of Year in 2016 are Pros Anticipating for Security Manufacturers/Suppliers; Dealers/Integrators; and Monitoring Providers?
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Jay Hauhn, Executive Director, Central Station Alarm Association (CSAA): Technology is moving at warp speed. That is putting tremendous pressure on all entities to deal properly with the speed of change. One big challenge is the ability of standards to stay current with frequently released, innovative offerings. Integrators and alarm dealers dealing with rapid product upgrades and releases have to significantly increase the time put into training in order to provide good service. Rapid advancements in wireless communication technology means reduced lifecycles for communications products, creating either budget challenges or new sales opportunities, depending on where you sit.
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Steve Surfaro, Chair, Security Industry Association (SIA) Standards Council: Compression technology will play a large role in 2016. Video surveillance manufacturers and solution providers will continue to improve and use various versions of H.264 since most VMS solutions are designed and based on H.264. Early use of H.265 will be restricted to video streaming functions only, for stable networks, due to the high complexity of encoding and lower computing resources that many lower cost network video camera manufacturers use.

Physical access control will be most impacted by the consolidation of panel functions like locking device control, global I/O, biometric template storage and additional functions built into the “edge” panel or reader. Biometric sensors will be most sought after in the transportation market with fingerprint and iris authentication. In some facilities, biometrics can be used to accurately track unescorted visitors as they move about.

RELATED: What are the Most Pressing Issues Pros Expect to Remain Unresolved in 2016?

Intrusion detection systems will see a continuing decrease in use of traditional zone-style wiring and an increase in the use of multiple sensors, including video cameras, as alarm confirmation and other false alarm reduction techniques.

Fire rapid detection, confirmation, false alarm reduction and location identification will all become primary requirements. Smoke and flame video surveillance analytics will support these efforts, though not as a primary sensing device, but as a supervisory signaling subsystem. Aspiration smoke detectors that actively draw air into a chamber for analysis are expected to grow in popularity. Of particular interest is the use of 3D printing for customized fire nozzle rotors for specific fire suppression dispersal patterns. Previously thought to be just for prototype development, this use of 3D printing will encourage other safety markets to improve while lowering costs.

About the Author

Contact:

Scott Goldfine is Editor-in-Chief and Associate Publisher of Security Sales & Integration. Well-versed in the technical and business aspects of electronic security (video surveillance, access control, systems integration, intrusion detection, fire/life safety), Goldfine is nationally recognized as an industry expert and speaker. Goldfine is involved in several security events and organizations, including the Electronic Security Association (ESA), Security Industry Association (SIA), Security Industry Alarm Coalition (SIAC), False Alarm Reduction Association (FARA), ASIS Int'l and more. Goldfine also serves on several boards, including the SIA Marketing Committee, CSAA Marketing and Communications Committee, PSA Cybersecurity Advisory Council and Robolliance. He is a certified alarm technician, former cable-TV tech, audio company entrepreneur, and lifelong electronics and computers enthusiast. Goldfine joined Security Sales & Integration in 1998.

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