2022 HoF Inductees Share Keys for Success in Today’s Security Industry

This year’s honorees were asked, if they were just entering security and planning to make a career out of it, what strategies would they deploy.

2022 HoF Inductees Share Keys for Success in Today’s Security Industry

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Since its launch in 2004, a highlight for me each year has been the opportunity to really get to know the often amazing, and never less than fascinating, lives of those special individuals annually selected for induction into the SSI Industry Hall of Fame.

It’s been incredible to discover the people behind the personas and gain insights from what has now swelled to more than 100 of the most accomplished, talented and dedicated practitioners to ever grace the electronic security profession.

I have had the pleasure to inform all of them about their recognition, and personally coordinated all the research to tell their life stories and written it up to share with the world. Imagine that!

It’s an institution encompassing so much essential industry history and the preservation of its legacy, spanning those serving the entire channel — from suppliers to dealers/integrators to monitoring centers to technology innovators to all manner of business disciplines. That proud tradition continues this month with a diverse assortment of six new enshrines, as well as selection of the second SSI Hall of Fame Ring of Honor distinction.

As part of this undertaking, I take advantage of the chance to probe the minds of these outstanding men and women for valuable insights that can benefit others aspiring to a high level of security success. I share as much of that as possible through this issue’s cover story, this column and online content (check out the slick interactive features introduced in 2021).

I asked each of this year’s honorees if they were just entering security and planning to make a career out of it, what strategies would they deploy.

“I would approach joining the security industry [as a vendor] today similarly to how I did 30 years ago: seeking out industry professionals to learn from. It is now much easier to see what’s happening in the industry and with top organizations, leaders and products through the Internet. I would search for a select few I believed in and then track their progress. There is such a focus on diversity today that I would have many more opportunities at my disposal than 30 years ago. — Kim Loy

“Being a manufacturer rep worked for me and is a great job. If you’re an inside sales or tech support rep and have a passion for people and products, keep looking for opportunities. Try to stand out and be special at something.” — Lance Dean

“From the perspective of government contracting for the security industry, there is a lot of competition for identical products. If you are a small start-up you cannot submit for a GSA contract until you have been in business for two years. And if your company is not able to buy at a competitive price you will be at a disadvantage. GSA competes the pricing you propose against existing GSA contracts and has a formula for the pricing they will allow. Unfortunately, there are contractors awarded not authorized by the manufacturer that may only be selling products at a low margin and this may render your proposed pricing noncompetitive. It is a good idea to conduct some research before going forward.” — Lynn de Seve

“If I was to come into the security industry today, I would focus on a Cloud-based security-as-a-service [SaaS] model, offering security services to clients on a managed service basis with better technology.” John Mack

“I would most likely obtain a degree in fire protection engineering so that I could offer engineering services. A more in-depth understanding of electronics and computer/programing would also be good for a foundation. The installer/service technician of tomorrow is not the installer/service technician of the mid-1970s. The installations of the near future will require an understanding of programing, logic, building networks and wireless networks. I do not see the future technician going into the field without part of the toolkit being a laptop. The challenge will be in training and then keeping individuals trained and certified.” — Shane Clary

“To continue to be successful, focus on solving real problems for people while ensuring that you bring life safety-grade earnestness to everything you do.” — Steve Trundle

About the Author

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Scott Goldfine is Editor-in-Chief and Associate Publisher of Security Sales & Integration. Well-versed in the technical and business aspects of electronic security (video surveillance, access control, systems integration, intrusion detection, fire/life safety), Goldfine is nationally recognized as an industry expert and speaker. Goldfine is involved in several security events and organizations, including the Electronic Security Association (ESA), Security Industry Association (SIA), Security Industry Alarm Coalition (SIAC), False Alarm Reduction Association (FARA), ASIS Int'l and more. Goldfine also serves on several boards, including the SIA Marketing Committee, CSAA Marketing and Communications Committee, PSA Cybersecurity Advisory Council and Robolliance. He is a certified alarm technician, former cable-TV tech, audio company entrepreneur, and lifelong electronics and computers enthusiast. Goldfine joined Security Sales & Integration in 1998.

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